The almost 24 percent of the U.S. population under 18 years old wields billions of dollars in… 1 answer below »

The almost 24 percent of the U.S. population under 18 years old wields billions of dollars in purchasing power. Companies such as eBay and Facebook want to capitalize on those dollars—legitimately, that is. eBay is exploring ways to allow consumers under 18 years old to set up legitimate accounts to both buy and sell goods. Children already trade on the site, either through their parents’ accounts or through accounts set up after they lie about their ages. Similarly, even though children under 13 are not allowed to set up Facebook accounts, about 7.5 million of them have accounts, and nearly 5 million account holders are under 10 years old. That translates to almost 20 percent of 10-year-old and 70 percent of 13-year-old active U.S. users on Facebook. Many of these accounts were set up with parental knowledge and assistance. Both eBay and Facebook say that protections will be put in place on children’s accounts and that parents will be able to monitor their children’s accounts. 3-11. Debate the pros and cons of allowing these companies to target children. Are these efforts socially responsible behavior? (AACSB: Written and Oral Communication; Reflective Thinking; Ethical understanding and reasoning) 3-12. Review the current state of online privacy and freedom in your country. Explain how eBay, Facebook, and other social media Web sites can target the under-18 market and still comply with local laws. (AACSB: Written and Oral Communication; Information Technology; Reflective Thinking)